All American Sod Farm, Best Turf Grass Sod Producer in Utah

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From our family to yours Video

“Just wanted to share how wonderful this company was to work with! The grass was beautiful and such great cutting! We didn’t have a single piece that had patchy spots! And it’s already taking off at an amazing rate! We have gotten many compliments and will be sending others here!! Thank you!!”             Shaylee H

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All American Sod Farm

We are serving the entire state of Utah with all their residential and commercial turf grass sod and hydroseeding needs. Cities include, but are not limited to:

Clinton, UT | Cottonwood Heights, UT | Draper, UT | Eagle Mountain, UT | Farmington, UT | Heber, UT | Herriman, UT | Highland, UT | Holladay , UT (incl. East Millcreek) | Hurricane, UT | Kaysville, UT | Kearns, UT | Layton, UTLehi, UT | Logan, UT | Magna, UT | Midvale, UT | Millcreek, UT | Murray, UT |North Ogden, UT | North Salt Lake, UT | Ogden, UT | Orem, UT | Payson, UT | Pleasant Grove, UT | Provo, UT | Riverton, UT | Roy, UT | Salt Lake City, UT | Sandy, UT | Saratoga Springs, UT | South Jordan, UTSouth Ogden, UT | South | Salt Lake, UT | Spanish Fork, UT | Springville, UT | St. George, UT | Syracuse, UT | Taylorsville, UT | Tooele, UT | Washington, UT | West Jordan, UT| West Valley City, UT |

AAS Pool and Grass

“My sod is beautiful! I put it under my kids tree house and it is soft and green. It looks amazing and my kids love playing on it!”       Raquel G

“Super easy, and great price! Drive in, pay, and pick up sod. Really good customer service! Will use them for all my sod needs. Google Drive will tell you to turn on 400 S to get to them, but that isn’t right. They are located in the parking lot of the nursery, at the south end, on Geneva rd.”     Rod H

New Innovations in the industry

ROBOTIC LAWN MOWERS

Luis M. Medina, an electrical engineer by training (New Jersey Institute of Technology), founded Evatech in 2003 to manufacture robotic equipment, including mowers. Today, his company produces four different series of robotic units, including three different-sized robotic lawn mowers. They range from the tiny robotic M.A.G.A., available with a 22-inch cutting deck or snow blade, to the commercial Trex 44 with a 44-inch cutting deck. The Trex (Terrestrial Robotic Explorer) is a result of “eight years of intellectual evolution and countless hours of experimentation,” says Medina from his manufacturing plant in Tarpon Springs, Florida.

“I lost my job, so I had the option of working for another company or doing something on my own, which is what I did,” says Medina. “I knew it would be risky, but it is paying off.”

Medina holds several patents for his robotic products, including their hybrid propulsion system. He says he is manufacturing and shipping mowers worldwide. The U.S. market comprises “about 40 percent” of his sales.

robotic lawn mowers

The National Robotics Engineering Center in Pittsburgh is engaged in robotic mowing development.

PHOTOS: NATIONAL ROBOTICS ENGINEERING CENTER

“Our mowers are used mostly in environments that are too extreme or dangerous for operators,” says Medina.

Another entrant into the robotic mower market is Summit Mowers LLC, New Albany, Mississippi, which offers several small, rubber-tracked robotic lawn mowers designed to cut hillsides or other difficult terrain. Its latest commercial model, the TRX-42-PRO, is powered by a 24-horsepower Kohler engine and can cut on slopes up to 50 degrees with a 300-foot range of operation.

Mowing the rough turf of hillsides and sloped properties is one thing; mowing the fine turf found on home lawns, commercial properties, parks, golf courses and sports fields is another.

Manufacturers are not yet as far along in producing robotic lawn mowers capable of cutting home lawns—at least not on a commercial scale. No such equipment exists yet. But some industry experts predict this will change. And it may change sooner than expected.

“Within the next 24 to 36 months, you are going to see autonomous mowing equipment for commercial usage,” says Rick Cuddihe, a consultant who has spent his entire adult life as a player in the commercial mowing market.

Cuddihe, who worked closely with innovator Dane Scag on developing some of the key technological features on today’s popular zero-turn mowers, is now heavily engaged with the National Robotics Engineering Center (NREC) in Pittsburgh. His goal is to develop autonomous commercial mowers. The NREC is an operating unit within the Robotics Institute of Carnegie Mellon University. The Center works closely with clients to apply robotics technologies to real-world processes and products.

robotic lawn mowers

The TRX-42-Pro from Summit Mowers mows on slopes up to 50 degrees.

PHOTO: SUMMIT MOWERS LLC

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